skip to Main Content
Coincidental Accretion #001, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #001, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #001, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #002, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #002, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #003, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #003, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #004, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #004, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #005, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #005, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #006, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #006, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #007, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #007, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #008, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #008, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #009, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #009, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #010, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #010, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #011, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #011, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #012, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #012, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #013, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #013, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #014, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #014, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #015, 2012-2014
Coincidental Accretion #015, 2012-2014

Project Description

In this series entitled Coincidental Accretion, I investigate the accumulative effects of mass consumption on any given space – in this case the 7500-acre seaport of Los Angeles, California. I drew inspiration from Donald Judd’s idea of how objects can be brought together in a way that depersonalizes them, as they achieve pure form in the space occupied and created by the objects.

I photographed over 6 million containers along with various structures in the seaport that defined volume and structured space. The metric arrangements arbitrarily guide color, form and material, that combine to create fleeting patterns with optical and color effects. Structures such as the automatons, cargo ships, semi-trailer trucks and locomotives, that handle and transport the stacked containers, all contributed toward an unending plethora of coincidental sculptures.

The resulting photographs offer a portal into a non-illusionistic space occupied by variations in the supply and demand of consumer goods, and the indeterminate scale of mass consumption.

Back To Top